How to manage ADHD in college

The transition to college can be tough for anyone—living away from home for the first time, juggling the responsibility of class, being on your own. It is easy to feel overwhelmed. But what if you have ADHD?

College students with ADHD face many challenges, but they can be overcome. (Credit: DIYLOL.com)

College students with ADHD face many challenges, but they can be overcome. (Credit: DIYLOL.com)

That can make the changes and challenges that college bring even tougher. For prospective college students with ADHD or even a current student with ADHD, here are some tips for how you can survive and succeed as an undergrad. Read more

Who wins the smart home wars, Apple or Google?

Looking for a little more technology in your life… and home? You may soon get your wish, as Google and Apple are said to be announcing their respective forays into smart home technology. What is smart home technology or home automation?

The latest smart home technology will amaze you. (Credit: Meme Generator)

The latest smart home technology will amaze you. (Credit: Meme Generator)

For now, each tech giant plans to give home owners control of their security systems, lighting and even appliances through their smartphones or tablets. Could this be the start of Jetson-like homes that do all the work for us—from turning on the lights when we enter to having dinner on the table when we get home? Read more

Earn $250 per month in Cengage Learning’s 21 Voices research program!

Do you ever feel that, as a college student, your voice is not heard? That schools and companies care more about their own interests than yours? If so, this is a great chance for you to change that by applying for Cengage Learning’s 21 Voices research program!

Cengage Learning, 21 Voices

What is 21 Voices?

You’re probably wondering what 21 Voices is. Read more

How racism remains to be prevalent in sports

The NBA and the NHL have been trending news lately, but not for the reasons either league would like. After racist comments made by Donald Sterling, owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, went viral, the NBA fined him and banned him from games for life.

Fans at Oracle Arena protest Clippers owner Sterling's remarks on racism. (Credit: Reddit)

Fans at Oracle Arena protest Clippers owner Sterling’s remarks on racism. (Credit: Reddit)

Within weeks of that decision, Boston Bruins fans took to Twitter to level racial slurs at Montreal Canadiens defenseman P. K. Subban, a black player, after his game-winning double overtime goal. The Bruins were quick to cry foul at the behavior of the Twitter users. Read more

The end of print newspapers on campus is near

The death of print has been touted for years now as more and more publications go online to keep readers. College student newspapers have been somewhat immune to this trend—up until now.

As more publications go online, print newspapers are starting to diminish. (Credit: MemeCenter)

As more publications go online, print newspapers are starting to diminish. (Credit: MemeCenter)

Recently newspapers on campus are also creating Web presences in order to stay vital. So is print dead in academia, too? Read more

Get the FAQs for college student academics

Whether you’re a freshman or a senior, college students have many questions. Some are perennial favorites, like why do I have to take electives. Others concern study habits and best strategies for a term paper. Here are a few answers to frequently asked questions and some college tips to help you get a student advantage in your academics.

College academics can be a cinch with the right tools. (Credit: Johnny Lopez & Randall Salazar)

College academics can be a cinch with the right tools. (Credit: Johnny Lopez & Randall Salazar)

Are electives not related to my major a waste of time?

Actually no, and we’ll tell you why… Read more

Neil DeGrasse Tyson reboots Carl Sagan TV series Cosmos

Have you seen this meme? It's likely in jest, but science enthusiasts may enjoy imagining a White House run by these two popular science educators.

Have you seen this meme? It’s likely in jest, but science enthusiasts may enjoy imagining a White House run by these two popular science educators.

Along with Bill Nye (who, according to reports from news sources, is his best friend), Neil DeGrasse Tyson is a voice championing science educator. While Nye duked it out with Creation Museum founder Ken Ham in a creationism vs. evolution debate (blogged about over on Questia), Tyson has recently made his foray into Nye’s old territory: television. On March 9, Tyson, along with the National Geographic Channel, Fox, and executive producer Seth MacFarlane (of Family Guy fame) relaunched Cosmos, the television program that made Carl Sagan a household name and excited a generation of viewers about the possibilities of space exploration and the wonders of just how the universe was formed. But will the 13-episode reboot live up to the fame of the original? Read more

Future jobs for liberal arts majors: What are the job prospects?

When picking a college major, consider what gives you the best chance at a job right out of college.

When picking a college major, consider what gives you the best chance at a job right out of college.

Worried that your humanities major might be dooming you to a life of ramen noodles from your basement apartment at your parent’s house? Well never fear. A recent study from the AAC&U and the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems has shown that liberal arts majors do have a shot at not only gainful employment, but also a career that equals the economic opportunities of graduates with a professional or pre-professional degree. So what are the job prospects for a liberal arts major? What future jobs are in store for you?

Long-term job prospects

There seems to be a lot of talk recently about the value in a liberal arts education, even though many people say that degrees in the humanities don’t offer the same job prospects that other courses of study do. However, on January 22, 2014, in “Liberal arts grads win long-term” for Inside Higher Ed, Allie Grasgreen reported that a study by the AAC&U and the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems found, over the long term, liberal arts majors do just as well earnings-wise. Read more

Degrees that will increase college students odds of finding a job after graduation

Monroe Community College Graduation at The Blue Cross Arena at the Rochester War Memorial. (Credit: David Maiolo)

Monroe Community College Graduation at The Blue Cross Arena at the Rochester War Memorial. (Credit: David Maiolo)

If you’re wondering what college degree will guarantee you a job after graduation, there may not be a fool proof answer, but some degrees certainly hold their weight in gold more than others. Recent surveys show that some of the college degrees that increase your odds of finding a job after graduation are the ones that have been trending for several years now, but what’s interesting, are the ones that maybe you didn’t know even existed.

The most job offers

According to data from the National Association for Colleges and Employers (NACE), reported in the Forbes post, “The College Degrees That Get The Most Job Offers,” by Susan Adams January 22, 2014, the top five college majors that produced the highest percentage of students reporting at least one job offer upon graduation were: Read more

College sports and academics: Reading level of student athletes

Recent research has questioned how prepared college athletes are in higher ed academics.

Recent research has questioned how prepared college athletes are in higher ed academics.

The revelation by University of North Carolina (UNC) whistleblower Mary Willingham that some college athletes read at a grade school level has received much attention. Willingham was a learning specialist in the Academic Support Program for Student Athletes at UNC. After conducting research on the literacy levels of athletes, she discovered that of 183 athletes in revenue-generating sports admitted to UNC between 2004 and 2012, 8-10 percent were reading below a third-grade level, about 60 percent were reading between the fourth- and eighth-grade levels. She also discovered that a tutor had written a paper for a football player. UNC has disavowed her, discredited her research, refused to conduct further investigation and suspended her research. Willingham has also received death threats. Read more